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The Egyptian Revolution

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Hadil

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 9:53 am

Israeli bull on Egypt

Israel after we are done with Mubarak, we will come for you!!!

Israeli official:" "Having said that, I'm not sure the time is right for the Arab region to go through the democratic process"


With a deep investment in the status quo, Israel is watching what a senior official calls "an earthquake in the Middle East" with growing concern. The official says the Jewish state has faith that the security apparatus of its most formidable Arab neighbor, Egypt, can suppress the street demonstrations that threaten the dictatorial rule of President Hosni Mubarak. The harder question is what comes next.
"We believe that Egypt is going to overcome the current wave of demonstrations, but we have to look to the future," says the minister in the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Israel enjoys diplomatic relations and security cooperation with both Egypt and Jordan, the only neighboring states that have signed treaties with the Jewish state. But while it may be more efficient to deal with a strongman in Cairo — Mubarak has ruled for 30 years — and a King in Amman, democracies make better neighbors, "because democracies do not initiate wars," he says.
(See pictures of Egypt's protests.)
"Having said that, I'm not sure the time is right for the Arab region to go through the democratic process," he adds.
The minister, who spoke on condition of not being identified by name or portfolio, cites the Gaza Strip as a signal warning of the risk that comes with asking the people what they want. The seaside territory, home to some 1.5 million Palestinians, elected the militant Islamist group Hamas in a 2006 election that had been carried out at the urging of George W. Bush, when the President was casting the invasion of Iraq as a mission to introduce democracy to the Middle East.
(How strong a mediator is Mubarak?)
All well and good in the long run, according to the official, but Arab societies demand "a longer-term democratization process," one accompanied by education reforms that would encourage the election of moderates. "You can't make it with elections, especially in the current situation where radical elements, especially Islamist groups, may exploit the situation," he says. "It might take a generation or so."
(Is the Arab world ready for democracy?)
The official's assessment, which came before raucous demonstrations Friday, Jan. 28, in Cairo, Suez and Alexandria, may strike many in the region as paternalistic at best. Along with oil, Israel is the major factor in U.S. policy that for decades has helped protect "moderate Arab regimes" now endangered by a populist wave that began in Tunisia. In a region whose national borders were drawn by colonial powers after World War I, the Jewish state is frequently framed by critics as itself a colonial undertaking, conceived in Europe, midwifed by Great Britain, coddled by Washington and imposed on an Arab region that sees Israel itself as colonizing through settlements and industrial zones the Palestinian land it has occupied militarily since 1967.
For their part, Israeli governments pride themselves on clear-eyed assessments of the risks they face. The official saw no special peril, for instance, in Lebanon's new government. Though supported by Hizballah, the Shi'ite movement backed by Iran, "we don't consider it a Hizballah government," the official says. But the Israeli government was duly impressed by the simultaneous outbreaks of instability across the region: citizen uprisings in Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt and Yemen; unrest in Jordan and the Kurdish section of Syria; and a secession vote in Sudan's south that most likely will split the country in two.
"It seems now we have quite an earthquake," says the Cabinet member, paying respects to the al-Jazeera satellite news channel and digital technologies that have dispersed the power to communicate and organize. "In the time of [former Egyptian President and pan-Arabist] Gamel Abdel Nasser, Egypt had one radio channel, and transistor radios were all allowed to listen to one channel."
(Watch a video explanation of Egypt's protests.)
A retired major general found other metaphors — and more cause for concern. "We need to understand that we are living on a volcano," Ya'acov Amidror, former head of the Israel Defense Forces' Research and Assessment Directorate, told the Jerusalem Post. "Conditions can change from today until tomorrow. We must ask ourselves, What is the worst-case scenario? We are on thick ice, but even that melts eventually."
Friday's events offered little comfort for worried Israelis. At least twice that day, hundreds of Cairo protesters dropped to their knees in impromptu prayer sessions, lending the demonstrations both a measure of piety and a specific religious cast lacking in previous days — and in the Tunisian rebellion altogether, at least at first. The Israeli minister cautions against drawing many parallels between Egypt and Tunisia, from which a President fled after 27 years in office. "Mubarak is not Zine el Abidine Ben Ali," he says. "It's a huge difference. His regime is well rooted in the military and security apparatus. He and his wife are not criticized like the Tunisian couple." The official adds, "We do believe the regime is strong enough to overcome it."

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/ ... 29,00.html
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WavesoftheOcean

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 10:21 am

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

Breaking News:

Egyptian police fire shots in Cairo
Egyptian police, backed by the army, have fired shots in Cairo as the wave of unrest continues to rage in parts of the Egyptian capital despite the government curfew and military patrolling.
Tens of thousands of demonstrators have flocked the streets of Cairo and other parts of Egypt since Tuesday as part of their biggest anti-government protests in years, demanding the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak after three decades in power.
On Saturday, medical sources stated that 23 protesters have lost their lives in streets fighting with police forces in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, while 13 people were killed and 75 others injured in the flash point city of Suez, along the strategic Suez Canal.
According to medical sources, at least 1,030 protesters have been injured so far in the North African Arab country as mass protests remain unabated for a fourth consecutive day.
On Friday, Mubarak sacked his cabinet and called for national dialogue in an attempt to staunch the flow of public outcry over poverty, high unemployment rates and rampant corruption in the country.
In another development in turmoil-hit Egypt, Israel pulled its embassy staff out of Egypt against the backdrop of public demonstrations.
Helicopters evacuated the embassy staff to an Egyptian airbase, where they were flown back to Tel Aviv. The evacuation came after a group of Egyptian demonstrators passed by the embassy building, according to the daily al-Quds al-Arabi newspaper.
Meanwhile, top United Nations officials urged the government of Egypt to protect the rights of its citizens amid the political protests.
"One of the ground principles of democracy is to protect and ensure the freedom of speech of the people," UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told reporters in Davos, Switzerland on Saturday.

Clashes in Alexandria kill 23 Egyptians
At least 23 Egyptian protesters have been killed during clashes with police in the port city of Alexandria as the explosion of anger at President Hosni Mubarak continues to rock the country.
On Saturday, medical sources stated that 23 protesters have lost their lives in streets fighting with police forces in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, while 13 people were killed and 75 others injured in the flash point city of Suez, along the strategic Suez Canal, where protesters torched a fire station and looted weapons that they then turned on police earlier on Thursday.
According to medical sources, at least 1,030 protesters have so far been injured as mass protests remain unabated across the country for a fourth consecutive day.
The fall-out comes after a curfew from 6 p.m. to 7 a.m. was imposed on Friday in Cairo, Suez and Alexandria.
Inspired by the recent popular revolution in Tunisia, which resulted in the historic overthrow of the country's President Zine El Abidin Ben Ali, Egyptians have staged similar anti-government protests since Tuesday, calling on Mubarak to relinquish power after three decades in office.
At least five people were killed in Cairo and two in Mansura, north of the capital on Friday, with many fatalities caused by rubber-coated bullets, medics and witnesses said.
On Friday, Mubarak sacked his cabinet and called for national dialogue in an attempt to staunch the flow of public outcry over poverty, high unemployment rates and rampant corruption.
Meanwhile, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon called for an end to violence in Egypt and urged the government to respect freedom of speech.

- http://www.presstv.ir/
- http://www.presstv.ir/live/

As we speak now protest are still active over many part of Egypt.

May Allah(SWT) Be with the people of Egypt and raise those who were martyred to the highest heavens of Firdous.

Fi Aman Allah
طفيتي شمعة عيوني .. يا دنيا
أظن وافيتـﭻ ديوني .. يا دنيا
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WavesoftheOcean

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 11:21 am

Egyptian Man Stands his Ground

Salam Aleikom Brothers and Sisters

Here's another video of the Egyptian Uprising...a brave man indeed.

I wish there was a 100000 of him MashAllah, he even twisted the pipe itself.

May Allah(SWT) Hasten the arrival of Imam Mahdi (A.S) and make us prepared for his arrival as his arrival is near.

Take care and best of regards
Fi Aman Allah
طفيتي شمعة عيوني .. يا دنيا
أظن وافيتـﭻ ديوني .. يا دنيا
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Thelitesoul

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:53 pm

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

Salam people...

I just want to make you aware that there are two types of military vehicles on the streets of Cairo...

There is the army, and there is the republican guard...

The Army was sent to protect public and private property...

While the republican guard are the ones ordered by Mubarak to impose the curfew...

A new curfew is supposed to be imposed right about now...
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Earthly

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 3:40 pm

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

Huffington Post wrote:Did Someone Recycle the Shah of Iran's Last Speech for Hosni Mubarak?

It was just weeks before he left Iran forever amidst a massive nationwide demonstration against him that the Shah of Iran broadcast his last speech to the people, apologizing for his past mistakes. On November 5, 1978, he pleaded:

"I heard the voice of your revolution. As Shah of Iran as well as an Iranian citizen, I cannot but approve your revolution. Let all of us work together to establish real democracy in Iran. I make a commitment to be with you and your revolution against corruption and injustice in Iran."

Not so for President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt. He did not apologize for anything in his speech to the people on their day of rage today. He did not make any amends and in fact repeatedly reinforced his power and authority:

My instructions to the government stressed that they provide an opportunity to the masses to express their views.

The government committed to my instructions and this was clear in the way the police handled the demonstrators.

In my capacity as president of the republic and by virtue of all the power conferred to me by the constitution...

I address you today not only as president of your republic but also as an Egyptian citizen.


And then he used the phrase that has even come to be dreaded amongst Americans:

"I am shouldering my first responsibility to maintain the homeland security."


Like the Shah before him, Mubarak promised to change things. He promised that he cared about the people.

I will always take the side of the poor people of Egypt.

I have always been keen toward directing the government's policies toward economic reform to lift the suffering of the people.


He used phrases in succession that he rarely if ever had used before:

"impoverished"

"the poor"

"people of low income"

"unemployment"

"raise the standard of living"

"freedom of expression"

"healthcare"

"housing"

Like the Shah before him -- a man whose grave is in the heart of Cairo because he was refused burial in the nation of his birth -- Mubarak's big speech indicated how very out of touch he was with the reality of the people and the reality of his own shortcomings in addressing their concerns.

We will continue our political, economic and social reforms for a free and democratic Egyptian society, embracing modern principles.

I have always been keen toward directing the government's policies toward economic reform to lift the suffering of the people.

The problems facing us and the goals sought by us cannot be achieved through violence or chaos, they can only be achieved by national dialogue and conscious, concerted, genuine efforts.


His speech most spectacularly overlooked the irony that if it hadn't been for the "chaos," he would never have undertaken to speak to the public at 1 a.m. on a Friday night. In the end, his threats against the people, though carefully worded, were clear enough:

There is a fine line separating freedom from chaos.

While I take the side of the citizen's freedom to express their views, I also similarly adhere to defending Egypt's stability and security.

We should be conscious and aware of the many examples around us which drove people to chaos and mayhem where they gained no democracy or stability.


Meanwhile, the streets of Egypt are still packed. Journalists who can are reporting that the speech was meaningless to the people, as they continued to defy government curfews and demonstrate through the night.

The Shah's last speech was also ignored. He, too was trying to conceal his anger at the insubordination of his people -- the people he thought he owned, which he learned that he didn't. Resting, deep in the corridors of Cairo, today he must have shivered in his grave at the lesson he learned, which Mubarak will no doubt learn himself -- that is, if foreign governments do not interfere in the Egyptian people's demands and abilities to change the direction of their future.
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jav3d

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:28 pm

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

Salaam

Omar Soliman Intelligence chief sworn in as new Egyptian vice president!!
Allahumma Salli ala muhammad wa ale muhammad alAima wa alMahdyeen wasaleem Tasleema Katheera.
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Ihsan

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:44 pm

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

jav3d wrote:Salaam

Omar Soliman Intelligence chief sworn in as new Egyptian vice president!!


All of them need to leave. Total revolution now.
Not a king, rather your servant, Beloved Lion.
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unplugged

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:04 pm

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

those behind this agenda are "very quick" at "updating"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omar_Suleiman

I don't like the smell of this...

la hawla wa la quwwata illa biAllah
Ma Shaa Allah kan - was Allah will geschieht
time is to the truth advantage





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Thelitesoul

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:25 pm

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

unplugged wrote:those behind this agenda are "very quick" at "updating"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omar_Suleiman

I don't like the smell of this...


Yes, they are looting the shops banks and companies as well...
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ZeE

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Post Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:39 pm

Re: The Egyptian Revolution

nicely put together, brother Earthly...

and it is in line with the article, which has been posted by brother mustafashaban in this thread(<-- thanks for sharing).

the headline tells everything...actually:

"Dictators" do not Dictate, They Obey Orders

:arrow: :arrow: http://globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=22993

(for those who have missed it for some reason)

عــــــــلــــــــــــي مــــــــــع الـــــــــــحـــــــــق والــــــــــــحــــــــــق مع عــــــــلــــــــــــــي


يــــــا عــــــلـــــــــــــــــــــــي


أَمَّنْ يُجِيبُ الْمُضْطَرَّ إِذَا دَعَاهُ وَيَكْشِفُ السُّوءَ

“O’Ali (asws)! No one recognized You except Allah and Myself. No one recognized Me except Allah and You. No one has recognized Allah except You and Me.”
- Rasool Allah (sawas)


Why I Do Not Believe In Ahmed Al-Hassan Anymore ...
The Imamate and the Will
The Loneliest Commander - Imam Hassan (a.s.) Series
Imam Reza (a.s.´) debate with a Priest, a Rabbi & an Atheist
My Spiritual Journey to the Middle East
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